smart dogs

Koda, the intuitive German Shepherd (part 3)

IMG_4511

“Having Koda is like having a kid together.

He adjusted pretty well after my dog died.

We treated him like he’s a member of the family.

He is never without us.

He travels with us, wherever we go.

The best of times with Koda, is when I am in NYC because walking around with him encourages me to explore areas I wouldn’t otherwise see.”

Koda, the intuitive German Shepherd (part 1)

IMG_4490

Koda is actually my boyfriend’s dog.

He’s always had German Shepherds.

I had a Boston Terrier when we met, called Winston.

I was nervous around Winston at first, because as a Shepherd, he looks so scary, but he turned out to be the sweetest dog.

Koda was very territorial of his home and I didn’t introduce him to Winston properly.”

 

Enzo, the Mini-Aussie with a touch of Corgi (part 1)

FullSizeRender-13

“My parents dog died and I made it a year without getting my own dog.

The last dog I had was half Aussie Shepherd and she was very good .  I wanted another Aussie Shepherd because I knew he would be trainable.

I’ve had him since he was twelve weeks old and he’s now two years.

He’s (almost) all Aussie, but his mom was part Corgi so that’s why he’s smaller.

He’s lived up to his name in being one of the smartest breeds.

People are amazed at how smart he is.

One time he had diarrhea and I wasn’t home and he chose to get sick in the bathtub.  I thought that was smart and thoughtful.”

Laura, the dog lover without a dog (part 1)

FullSizeRender-3

“The very first time I came to the dog run was after my neighbors moved.  I got curious to see this place called the dog run where they used to take their dog.

The dogs and the people were wonderful.  I’ve made a lot of very good friends here.

I’ve watched the Dog Whisperer on television and I like to try out his techniques.                   I’ll give you an example: When I see children trying to get their dog to chase the ball and they don’t get the dog’s full attention first (they just throw the ball), I tell them, first make sure the dog is paying to them and and if they show the dog the ball and the dog sees them throw it, this is the best way to start the game.

I wouldn’t say that to just anybody.  It’s to the children who seem open to my advice.  They really want to play with the dogs but they don’t know how.  I try to show them how to get on the same wavelength as the dog.

Another thing that is so gratifying is to keep up with friends from the dog run while they are away.  I like to keep them updated on their dogs play and experiences at the run and put their minds at ease.

Once I was trying to pass by a small dog and it jumped up at me, lunging towards my face, and I fell and broke my arm.

This is one of the reasons I urge people to dissuade their dogs from jumping on people.”