poodles

Percy & Watson, the standard poodles that ease the stress of every day life (part 5)

fullsizerender-120

“I have found that my dogs play a similar role in my life.

For me, what’s most joyous is accepting responsibility for them.

They give me the chance to give them the care and love they innately deserve.

That means consistency and being a presence in their life on a daily basis.

They give me the chance to be a better person.”

Percy & Watson, the standard poodles that ease the stress of every day life (part 4)

FullSizeRender-145

“I am a teacher and I work with some kids that have emotional difficulties.

I see how helpful the dogs are in stressful situations and how stabilizing and reassuring they can be.

Some of the kids have service dogs, which provide a venue for affection and the opportunity to care for another being without judgement or conditions.”

Percy & Watson, the standard poodles that ease the stress of every day life (part 3)

FullSizeRender-141

“There weren’t major changes when Percy lost his eyesight.

They had both been taught visual as well as aural commands, so the transition was pretty smooth.

I am not sure Watson is aware that Percy is blind, but they don’t run around as much together.

When we walk, Watson will walk on the outside to keep Percy sandwiched in between us.

As a New York City teacher, I definitely carry a lot of stress on a daily basis and living and working with the dogs has shown me how to deal with my feelings better.”

JARVIS, THE GOLDEN DOODLE PUPPY THAT WAS BORN THE DAY WE GOT ENGAGED (PART 5, HE SAID)

IMG_1369

“One of the best times since having Jarvis was when he was a tiny puppy and was so small and carefree.

He had a real innocence.

It took me out of the business of life.

He was a great distraction from the stress and pressures of daily life.

Also, on of the awesome things about Jarvis is that he was boron the day I proposed and my fiancé said, yes.”

JARVIS, THE GOLDEN DOODLE PUPPY THAT WAS BORN THE DAY WE GOT ENGAGED (PART 2, HE SAID)

IMG_1498-2

“We initially planned to get a dog after getting married, but we decided to get a dog after Balto died.

We were thinking about getting a Bernese Mountain Dog, but we found out that they have a short life expectancy and that they shed.

Then we found out that doodle breeds are great for non-shedding.

My fiancé suggested the golden doodle because of the no-shedding and they are mild mannered in terms of temperament.

We wanted to get a puppy to raise together.”

Lulu, the Maltipoo (part 3)

fullsizerender-124

“My kids are teenagers, now.

Lulu can tell when something is bothering them or they are sick.

When my son was around five, he was afraid to go upstairs to the second floor by himself and he would take Lulu with him for security.

Lulu brings so much love to our family.

When I see my kids playing with her, I enjoy watching them express their to love towards  her freely.

When my kids were younger, they could be moody–but never with Lulu.”

Ziggy, the dog who spreads joy wherever he goes (mom part 2)

“I’ve had Ziggy for two months.

The best moment was bringing him home.

I am going through a divorce and I have been lonely.

Ziggy is a great companion.  He is very loving.  His first priority is to be a pet.  He follows me everywhere.  It’s hard to get privacy.

The hardest thing is that he is scared of street noises.  They stress him out.  I am exposing him a little bit each day and rewarding him when he looks up at me while he’s on the leash.  I basically reward him whenever he’s not too preoccupied to take the treat.”

Ziggy, the dog that spreads joy wherever he goes (mom part 1)

FullSizeRender-65

“I’ve always had a dog or multiple dogs and I recently relocated to New York, so I got a mini Golden doodle.  I hoped that he would adjust to city life easier than a big dog (needing less space and exercise).

I also wanted a buddy.

I should add that my daughter really wanted a dog and that weighed heavily in the decision making process.

I’ve had two other standard Golden doodle’s and I loved them.

They are incredibly loyal, fun and sweet.

He came from Kentucky, where my other two doodles came from.

I had him flown to New York and everything went smoothly.”

Stanley,the red Poodle (he said, part 4)

“One of the scariest moments after having him for about a month was when he was lethargic and and salivating a lot.  He just wasn’t himself.

I thought he was going to die.

I panicked.

We took him to the vet and she said it was probably a food allergy.  We gave him a Benadryl and switched his food.  He was fine after that incident.

In general, he’s a fun loving dog and entertaining dog to have.

He’s very friendly to everyone and he always wants to play.

We have a new responsibility together so we have to work as a team to make sure Stanley is taken care of.  That work has brought us closer together.

We are more of a family.

Sam, the dog that was meant to be with Marcia (part 1)

FullSizeRender-26

“It’s really crazy.  I wanted a dog for 20 years, but job-wise I couldn’t take care of one.

I got laid off and was free-lancing from home.  I was daydreaming of having this imaginary dog.  He went with me wherever I went.

One afternoon I was walking with a friend in Central Park for exercise and I told her, you are going to think I’m a nutcase, but I’ve been having this imaginary dog.  We started laughing and 20 minutes later we came upon a woman sitting on a bench with a puppy that looked like a dandelion of puff.  He was just a little ball of fur.  My friend said, you should ask if you can pet him, so I did.  The next thing I knew I was holding him and petting him.

The woman said, he’s actually up for adoption.

The foster family that had him wasn’t a good fit for several reasons.  The biggest was that he had terrible separation anxiety.  When I picked him up from his foster home, the doorman told me they were gone of long periods of time and he would bark for 10 hours straight.

I had to break him of his separation anxiety.

I started to carry him around in a little chest pouch.  We were together 24/7.  I started the separation very slowly.  I made it into a game.  I would close the bathroom door and open it quickly.  I gave him positive reinforcement and a treat before he had time to get anxious.   I extended the time every day.  I always did it as play to make it less scary and build trust.

I wanted him to know I was always coming back.

The first time I left him alone it was for 4 hours and he cried.”