hope

Yoda, the Rescue Pug Who Needed Some Loving (part 5)

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Twiggy, the Italian Greyhound/Chihuahua mix Rescue (part 5)

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“I am lucky to have such understanding neighbors.

I received a note under my door the first time I left her alone saying, your dog has been barking and crying the entire time you were gone. It was so sad, the next time you leave, please just drop her off with us.

We leave her with the family next door, but I don’t want to take advantage of them.

I have been considering bark busters, but am trying to leave her alone for short intervals of time and build up to longer periods.

Twiggy has become the emphasis of our lives.

We are devoted to her and she is semi-devoted to us.”

 

Twiggy, the Italian Greyhound/Chihuahua mix Rescue (part 3)

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“She said, I have the perfect dog for you, and went and got Twiggy, who at the time was called Grace.

Twiggy was the dog we had craned our necks earlier to look at.

She told us Twiggy’s background we gave her our references.

She said, she admired one of our references, who turned out to be the publicist for the Humane Society.

I thought it was a done deal.

She came back with the paperwork and said, I am so sorry, I’ve been away for a week and there are two people ahead of you for Twiggy.”

Gracie, the Chihuahua and Boscoe, the Pit Bull Terrier, Rescues (part 3)

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“Our vet wasn’t sure he could save Boscoe’s leg because the bullet was lodged in the elbow of his leg, making surgery difficult.

I found a specialist and he had surgery the next day.

That was two years ago and he is fully recovered and trots like a horse.

The second time I moved to Texas I bought a trailer park as an investment and there was a tenant who just let his dogs run amok on the property.

One of his friend’s chihuahua mated with a neighbors’ terrier and Gracie was one of the puppies.”

 

Dodger, the Schnauzer Terrier mix, Rescued from the CACC (Center for Animal Care and Control)(part 2)

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“I went to look at a Chihuahua mix that was on their website, because I wanted a smaller dog, but by the time I got there, that dog had been adopted.

I looked around and saw Dodger (who wasn’t on the website).

The shelter workers didn’t think he was ready to be adopted because he was timid and wasn’t used to walking on a leash.”

Dodger, the Schnauzer Terrier mix, Rescued from the CACC (Center for Animal Care and Control)(part 1)

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“I’ve had Dodger over 10 years.

I had just finished school and I wanted a best friend.

My family always had pets.

I felt like there was that whole in my life that needed to be filled.

I tried several shelters in the NYC area and the last one I went to was the CACC.”

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“I had another fospice (foster/hospice) dog through Second Chance.  She was older and so easy going.

Basically fospice is a dog that has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or a really old dog.

Both are hard to get adopted.

After the last dog, Maddie, passed away (she was old and had a problem with her spleen that was not treatable), we got Beau.

I saw him on fosterDOGSNYC.org and thought he looked like a nice little old man.

It said he had a heart condition and was around twelve.  I contacted fosterDogs and filled out an application.

A week later, Beau joined our family.”

Ajax, the tripod

“My husband and I worked long hours. We didn’t think we had the time for a dog until we saw all the people coming and going in our apartment building with dogs.  We learned about dog walkers, doggie day care and the NYC dog world.

We knew we wanted a labrador retriever. We didn’t know about lab rescue, but we knew we didn’t want to go to a breeder.

My husband had been going to a restaurant on the upper west side, called Fred’s.  It was named after a lab that was released from the Guiding Eyes of Yorktown Heights.

We began asking people whose labs we liked where they got their dogs.  Several of them mentioned that they had adopted from Guiding Eyes– including our favorite pair from the neighborhood, Hoop and Hula.  Their names were cheerful and the dogs were smart and had big personalities.

We investigated and put our names on a waiting list for a released puppy.

When we were called after six months we had to say no to their first offer. We were both out of town on business and only had four days to accept.

About four months later, they emailed a photo of a brindle lab in a basket with a sunflower and his little paws hanging over the side.  I had a brindle mutt growing up, so as soon as I saw his coloring I knew he was mine.

The first moment that was other than pure joy was when we found out he had cancer.

My mother and my husband’s father both died from cancer, so fear was our immediate emotion.

The cancer was localized in his right hind leg near his knee. It was a tumor in the carriage. we had many choices, including radiation, but a specialist told us that amputation was the gold standard and would be curative.

After surgery he walked out of the animal hospital and hopped himself into a yellow cab.

They took his stitches out after two weeks. We went to a friends house   thinking he could relax in their years and recover.  The moment we turned our heads, he ran through a sprinkler and jumped in the swimming pool.

That was five and a half years ago.  He’s now on wheels, but still getting around.”