dogs and people

Olive, the Bassett Hound, Staffordshire Terrier mix (part 2)

“Before the dogs were transported up to New York the rescue group posted a video of Olive and her sister Katy.

When they got here, my son said, we should visit Olive first.

He had a gut feeling.

We visited her and her foster family in Brooklyn and that was it.

She was three or four months old and was so friendly that we said, we’ve got to get this dog.

She is a year now.

The hardest thing for me was house training her.

It takes patience.

I thought it would take a couple of weeks, but it took a few months.

She pee’d on the rug for a few months.

We had to learn her body rhythms.

It finally paid off.”

Olive, the Bassett Hound, Staffordshire Terrier mix (part 3)

“We go upstate for the weekends and watching her run free and explore and swim is a joy.

The family spends more time outside since having Olive, and we talk to strangers on the street.

That can be good and bad.

One day in the cold rain in November, I was walking Olive and a stranger told me, you should die, for just being outside.

She thought I was abusing Olive, when I was just taking her outside to go to the bathroom.

At first I wondered if I was doing the wrong thing, but then I realized that I was simply being a responsible caring dog owner.

We were both in the cold rain.

It’s like having a kid; you close your eyes and just do it.”

Olive, the Bassett Hound, Staffordshire Terrier mix (part 1)

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“Everybody in my family likes dogs and we didn’t have one.

My seven year old really wanted a dog, so we started looking online for rescues.

We looked on Petfinder, but a friend who got her dogs through Unleashed, NY, recommended them.

We saw a puppy called Hugo, who the family liked.

He  was going to be brought up north from Virginia in the fall, when we wanted our dog.

We expressed interest in Hugo, but he died from Parvo.

He had two sisters in his litter and Olive was one of them.”

 

Dipper, the Wheaton Terrier with nine lives (part 2)

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“I came home from medical school and in some sort of twisted way, having Dipper in this pitiful situation, took me out of the misery that I was experiencing in school.

I refocused on family and the things that made me happier before my med school misery.

Then of course, Dipper made a miraculous recovery.

He was able to put med school in perspective, and stick around afterwards.

Now is not a good time for me to get a dog, but I hope my parents choose to get another dog once Dipper is gone.”

Dipper, the Wheaton Terrier with nine lives (part 1)

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“I was nine when my family got Dipper and I’ve spent my last 15 years with him.

We share a birthday.

It’s amazing growing up with a dog.

Simply put, dogs are so much fun.

I spent hours under the kitchen couch, petting and tickling Dipper.

One of the joys of having Dipper was watching him run in our backyard because he used to get these spontaneous  bursts of energy and run and run.

His energy was contagious and I played chase with him for hours.

The joint responsibility of owning Dipper brought my family closer together in that we shared the walking duties.  Learning the work that comes with having a dog helped my personal growth.

This past year was difficult.

I was in medical school and was miserable from  working day and night on material  I didn’t like.  Then I got a text from my mother, saying Dipper was doing terribly. He couldn’t control his bowels and he couldn’t stand up.

My mom thought he was going to die.”

Otis, the comical Pug (part 2)

“Pugs shed, whine, drool and are chewers.

I wasn’t prepared for all of that, but I decided that he’s my puppy child, and it is what it is.

If people don’t like it, they don’t have to come over.

It’s Otis’s house.

The worst think about having him is how needy he is.

This breed is a needy one.

Otis is always under foot.  I can’t even go to the bathroom without him being by my side.

If I shut the bathroom door, or any door, he cries and bangs on the door.

I’ve gotten used to  him watching me on the toilet.

It’s the easiest option and he doesn’t judge me.”

Otis, the comical Pug (part 1)

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“I sold my big house in New Jersey where I raised my children and I had lost my pets about a year before that.

I moved to New York City with my husband after he retired, leaving my friends and family and needed a new wingman (so to speak).

I wanted a dog that was still dog-sized, but easy enough to travel with.

After I moved,  and began to walk around the neighborhood, I  was drawn to the Pug breed.

Their faces were comical and made me giggle.

They seemed low maintenance.

All lies.

You can never do your homework enough.

You can never do your homework enough.”

Kasidy, the contemplative dog walker (part 3)

fullsizerender-11“The only limitation of this job is that it is very physically demanding.

I try shoe inserts, take ibuprofen as needed, and am aware of my posture and try to walk as efficiently as possible.

The concrete is hard on the body.  I walk between 7-9 hours a day.

Another downside of the job is the weather– extreme heat, rain and cold can be difficult.

Whenever I am coming to work, riding on the train, I take the first 15 minutes to meditate.

I meditate on the word emptiness.  I try to mimic their openness.

I try to just enjoy where we are in that moment.”

Kasidy, the contemplative dog walker (part 2)

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“It’s also easier to start the day with a lot of excitement.

The dogs are always eager to see me.

I am really emotionally bonded with Earl because it took so long to earn his trust.

At first he was very skittish and then apathetic, but there came a time, a few months in, that I noticed his tail would wag and he would start this happy howl when I came.

That’s a great feeling.”

Kasidy, the contemplative dog walker (part 1)

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“I am an actor, formally, and I needed a nice job with flexibility.

I tried a lot of other jobs, like handing out fliers in Times Square in costume (I was John Lennon in a Sargent Pepper outfit, a sailor in a pink outfit to advertise La Cage Au Folles when it was on Broadway), receptionist at a gym, and then I found dog walking.

It is a lot less emotionally degrading.

I like lots of things about the dogs.

I like that other’s no ego or persona.

The dogs just are who they are.

They are always living in the moment.”