border collies

Zimmy, short for Zimmerman, the German Shepherd mix rescue named after Bob Dylan (part 5)

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“It can be fatal if not treated, or a dog doesn’t respond to steroids.

Zimmy was on steroids for an entire year.

That was seven years ago and he is still here.

I am a divorced middle aged guy and Zimmy has been my best friend.”

Lola, the Corgi, Border Collie, Australian Shepherd mix (he said, part 3)

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“My son was watching tv and feeding her raisins.

We had to rush her to the vet because my girlfriend and I knew it was dangerous.

The vet had to induce vomiting and put her on fluids for hydration.

We now have a list of food on the refrigerator, and the kids learned a valuable lesson.

One of the ways Lola has changed my life is that I feel more grounded.

In a divorce situation it’s strange having children come and go (for both the parents and the kids), and having Lola all the time has helped smooth out the waves.

One more thing– I recommend adopting and supporting your local shelter.”

Lola, The Corgi, Australian Shepherd, Border Collie mix (part 1, she said)

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“My boyfriend and I had been discussing getting a dog and I took his kids into a store at Columbus Circle to buy him a Father’s Day present.

While we were shopping, he found the North Shore Animal League Adoption Truck.

He called me and said, you need to come out here as soon as you’re done because I want to show you something.

That something was Lola.

We all walked into the truck and there was lots of encouragement from the kids to get a dog.

It was a fairly impulsive buy.

That was a year ago, Father’s Day.”

Chewie, the Border Collie/Mini Australian Shepherd lifesaver (part 3)

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“The most joyous moment I can think of, was the first time I brought her home.

I realized that with Chewie, I am not alone; that we are going to go places together.

She acts as a service dog.

I clean houses and I bring her to work with me.

She picks an area in the apartment, out of the way and stays there the entire time I am working.

She trusts me, and knows that I will come and get her when I am done.

Chewie has changed my life in that I am able to cope with every day life better than before I got her.”

Chewie, the Border Collie/mini Australian Shepherd, lifesaver (part 2)

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“Chewie helped me through a tough time.

I was depressed and she helped me get out of the house whether I wanted to or not.

Walking a dog 3 or 4 times a day gives me clarity.  It makes me feel like whatever is troubling me is going to be okay.

The routine gives me something to do, and my focus is on something other than myself.

Chewie knows when I am unhappy.

She gets very upset if I am crying, so I try not to cry in front of her.

If she feels that I am sad or upset, she won’t leave my side.”

Chewie, the Border Collie/Aussie lifesaver (part 1)

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“I was lonely and felt that I didn’t have any life in me.

My psychiatrist told me to get a dog.

That was 7 years ago.

While I was on vacation I saw a Border Collie that I liked a lot and I thought, this is the kind of dog I want.

I went on the internet and searched and found a breeder in New Jersey.

I waited a few months for Chewie to be born, and then another few months to take him home.

We both felt like we belonged together from the moment I brought her home.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 2)

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“She’s noisy, but not in a balky way.  She’s got a full range of growls, snorts and other sounds.

She’s a bit of a diva.

She likes to remind you that she’s there by either making noises (ranging from a purr to a bark), or snuggling into you.

The complications  of adopting a dog whose history is unknown and figuring out her quirks can be difficult.

She can be possessive of things, which leads me to think maybe she was on the street and had to fight for something, anything.

She doesn’t show signs of abuse but she has some anxious habits (like all her unusual sound effects).”

 

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 1)

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“I was thinking to adopt in August of 2013 but I didn’t really know what I wanted.

I stopped in to a shelter just to see what the process was and they were taking Sandy for a walk, so we had a chance meeting.  I was with a friend and a roommate and we were all taken with her.

I didn’t know what I was looking for in a dog, but she was the right size (I think of her as the biggest small dog).

She has a ridiculously cute underbite, her legs turn out, she has one white paw and she was immediately warm towards us.”

 

Sam, the dog that was meant to be with Marcia (part 1)

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“It’s really crazy.  I wanted a dog for 20 years, but job-wise I couldn’t take care of one.

I got laid off and was free-lancing from home.  I was daydreaming of having this imaginary dog.  He went with me wherever I went.

One afternoon I was walking with a friend in Central Park for exercise and I told her, you are going to think I’m a nutcase, but I’ve been having this imaginary dog.  We started laughing and 20 minutes later we came upon a woman sitting on a bench with a puppy that looked like a dandelion of puff.  He was just a little ball of fur.  My friend said, you should ask if you can pet him, so I did.  The next thing I knew I was holding him and petting him.

The woman said, he’s actually up for adoption.

The foster family that had him wasn’t a good fit for several reasons.  The biggest was that he had terrible separation anxiety.  When I picked him up from his foster home, the doorman told me they were gone of long periods of time and he would bark for 10 hours straight.

I had to break him of his separation anxiety.

I started to carry him around in a little chest pouch.  We were together 24/7.  I started the separation very slowly.  I made it into a game.  I would close the bathroom door and open it quickly.  I gave him positive reinforcement and a treat before he had time to get anxious.   I extended the time every day.  I always did it as play to make it less scary and build trust.

I wanted him to know I was always coming back.

The first time I left him alone it was for 4 hours and he cried.”

Mitzi, the lifesaver and Ollie, the lover (part 2)

FullSizeRender-18“Ollie looked for her where we used to walk in the park together.

Mitzi lives on with us through Ollie.  She taught him the dog language of mutual love and respect.  She taught him not to wake me up at night, that no means no, and just good dog behavior.

Ollie has his own personality.  He is hysterically funny.

In the morning he looks at me with his underbite and his bed head and I collapse in a fit of laughter. He shows great affection.  He likes to prance up to people to give them kisses.

For every one person that is annoyed at him for his bold friendliness, there are 100 people that say thank, your dog just made my day.

When your kids are gone, the nurture gene doesn’t just go away.

He’s a giver and a receiver of love.

A friend called him a furry beating heart.

He’s just a gift.”