anthropology

Hero, Izumi, Melons, a family of rescues (part 2 –she said)

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“I volunteer at the CACC (Care for Animal Control Center) and Melons was set to be euthanized.

He was almost 4 and had kennel cough.

I had him pulled from the euth list and agreed to foster him–that was 6 months ago.

I pretty much knew from the first day that I would keep him.

I didn’t make it official until I had him for 4 months.

I also volunteer with Best Friends Animal Society and they were having a pop up adoption event where I was working.

I saw that the CACC had an adoption van parked nearby and went out to say, hello.

One of the adoption counselors had Izzy in her lap.  She looked exactly like Hero and was incredibly sweet.

I finished working the Best Friend’s event and went home with Izzy.”

Hero, Izumi and Melons, a family of rescues (part 1-she said)

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“I found hero in Shanghai.

I was living in China for 2 years studying Mandarin in an immersion program.

The month before I was set to leave, and my visa was about to expire, I was walking down a super busy street and I saw a puppy running in the street.

I picked her up and asked people around me if she was theirs, and she was not.

She was filthy, underweight, and missing big chunks of fur.  She was a mess.

I brought her home with no plans to keep her, and a month later I bought her a plane ticket, had her microchipped and got her a rabies vaccine.

After an 18 hour flight, Hero became an American dog.”

Charlie, the lab mix with a great smile (part 3)

“I’ve always wanted to have 2 dogs; 1 called Charlie and the other called Dave.

FullSizeRender-50For right now we’ve got 1 dog, Charlie.

We took him to my parents house and he got into some fermented dough and he was lying on the ground seizing.

My father called me at work while Charlie was under the table, delirious.

I took him to the emergency vet at 3 p.m.

I remember carrying him while crying, and I signed a waiver saying they could do whatever  it took to save him.

They flushed his system with charcoal and fluids and wanted to keep him overnight.  When I went to see him and say goodbye he was still delirious.

They didn’t know if he would make it.”

Charlie, the lab mix with a great smile (part 1)

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“I grew up with dogs.

I was single and living alone so I put off getting a dog.

When I got engaged and bought a house I decided it was time to get a dog.

I own my own business so I could take a dog to work.  I knew I wouldn’t be leaving him at home all day by himself because I had flexibility.

I knew I wanted a Labrador Retriever or a Lab mix.

There is a rescue agency based in Rhode Island that rescues dogs from down south and places them up and down the northeast coast.

I saw a photo of Charlie on their site.  He was brought up to a foster family in Rhode Island from Alabama.

I decided to surprise my wife.”

Zoe, the rescue from down the block

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“My wife and I  lived on the same block as a woman who had Zoe and another dog.  Zoe was 8 months old and the other dog was 10 years old.

We saw the dogs daily and we befriended their owner.

She was a nurse in her early 20’s who had rescued her puppy with her boyfriend, on a lark when she saw a North Shore Animal League mobile adoption vehicle.

She broke up with her boyfriend, joined nurses without borders and moved out of the city.

About a month after she left the city, she had one of her friends leave a letter with our doorman asking us to call her about her puppy, Zoe.”

Jean Luc, the companion French Bulldog (part 4)

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“Eventually I took Jean Luc to daycare and printed the photos they posted on Facebook.

I put those photographs on my mother’s  mirror.

With Jean Luc, there was always something to talk about with her.

A few days before she died he wouldn’t go on her bed.  He wouldn’t even go in her room.

He was with her as long as she was consciously aware.

After she died and I brought him back to her house he helped me cope.

Snuggling and having Jean Luc around helps fill the hole.”

Jean Luc, the companion French Bulldog (part 2)

“I wanted to keep the whole thing a secret, until I appeared at my mother’s house with the dog, but I couldn’t keep the secret.

When my brother and I went to pick the dog out, and my mother asked where we were going, I spilled the beans.

My mother was so excited.

Jean Luc was the runt of the litter, so he was the smallest and he was also the cuddliest.

My brother thought it was idiotic to get a dog while I was going back and forth to mother’s, but I knew that it was going to make her so happy to have the puppy around.

My mother just loved him.”

Jean Luc, the companion French Bulldog (part 1)

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“Someone I worked with had a French Bulldog that came to the office every day.

That dog and I were good friends, and I realized when I was ready to get a dog, I was going to get a French Bulldog.

My mother got diagnosed with lung cancer and she loved dogs.

Very soon after the diagnosis I was coming back to the city via the Long Island Railroad and there was a guy on the platform with a 14 month old Frenchie.

On the train ride back to NYC I talked to this guy and his dog sat with me.  I asked him where he got his dog and  decided I should call his breeder to see if there were any puppies.

When I found out that there were puppies available I decided it would make my mother really happy, if, when I came to visit I had a puppy or a dog.

I said, ok, I want a dog.”

Diego, the sensitive greyhound rescue (part 4)

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“I filed for separation from my husband a few months after Nutmeg died.

I realized that both Nutmeg and Diego were my guardian angels.

Throughout the stress of divorce and daily life, my dogs have been a grounding force.

They’ve been angelic.

They have wisdom.

Having dogs has centered my focus.

No matter what I am going through, I always have a reason to get up, walk, and feed Diego.

I always have a grounding responsibility that is a privilege.”

Diego, the sensitive greyhound rescue (part 3)

“Nutmeg died in front of Diego and me.  It was painful to watch.

I thought Diego was going to die, too.

He literally shut down.  He stopped eating, going to the bathroom and he wouldn’t move.

It took weeks for him to recover.

I started to feed him home cooked meat and let him lay down anywhere.  The furniture that had been forbidden for the dogs was now welcome for Diego to lay on.

I was willing to do whatever it took to get him back to the living.”