shiba inu

MABEL, THE JINDO,CAIRN TERRIER, CHIHUAHUA RESCUE FROM KOREA (SHE SAID, PART 3)

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When I held her, she rested her chin on my arm and I fell in love with her.

I asked myself for a split second, if I was ready and my husband said, she’s the one.

Now I see myself as her parent, and I am there for her, with whatever she needs.

My husband and I come together and we are a team for Mabel.

She has become our priority.

Having Mabel has taught me to think beyond myself, and I love being able to take care of her.

Giving her love and receiving unconditional love back has been a blessing.”

MABEL, THE JINDO,CAIRN TERRIER, CHIHUAHUA RESCUE FROM KOREA (SHE SAID, PART 2)

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“We started following Korean K9 Dog Rescue’s website and saw Mabel’s photograph four months later.

I looked at her picture every day for 11 days.

I found out there was an event happening in Long Island City.

We waited on line for over an hour and a half to meet her.

I looked for her, but she wasn’t in the center, playing with the other rambunctious puppies.

She was off in a corner, curled up in a little ball.

She was already a year old and was so calm.”

MABEL, THE JINDO,CAIRN TERRIER, CHIHUAHUA RESCUE FROM KOREA (SHE SAID, PART 1)

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“We were at a point in our lives my husband and I had a lot of love to give.

We were looking for the right recipient.

We decided to get a dog, because I kept talking about it.

There was never a perfect time, because we both work full time and travel a lot.

We wanted to help a dog in need, so we looked into Korean dog rescue because they are commonly euthanized or sold for the meat trade.”

Kasidy, the contemplative dog walker (part 3)

fullsizerender-11“The only limitation of this job is that it is very physically demanding.

I try shoe inserts, take ibuprofen as needed, and am aware of my posture and try to walk as efficiently as possible.

The concrete is hard on the body.  I walk between 7-9 hours a day.

Another downside of the job is the weather– extreme heat, rain and cold can be difficult.

Whenever I am coming to work, riding on the train, I take the first 15 minutes to meditate.

I meditate on the word emptiness.  I try to mimic their openness.

I try to just enjoy where we are in that moment.”

Milo and Mr. Humbert, the delinquents (part 2)

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“That was 2011.

Bert was very attached to my college aged son and didn’t want to travel anymore.

Whenever he saw my suitcase he wouldn’t leave my son’s lap and made himself scarce during travel preparations.

I wasn’t really looking for another dog.

I knew my husband wouldn’t be thrilled, but I saw Milo at an adoption event at our pet store.  He was the exact same size as Mr. Bert, but with a very different personality.

We call Mr. Bert the mean mother because he’s always correcting other dogs.

We call Milo the perm puppy because he is always getting into trouble.”

Elmo & Frida, the California rescues (she said part 1)

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“Elmo and Frida were found abandoned and locked in a condo complex in South East Los Angeles during a 110 heat wave.

They had no food or water for a week and no-one paid any attention to them.

I had cats, and my cat sitter noticed them there because she had a client in that building.  She inquired about them and nobody knew anything.

She sent out an email to all of her clients in search of a home to see if someone could adopt them together because they were already so  bonded.

That same week I had decided to move to New York from a large house and a yard, to a studio apartment.

I decided to adopt them.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 3)

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“Sandy is a fun dog to come home to.

She always wags her tail to greet me.  We have our moment together and then we usually go for a walk.

I don’t have children, but there are obvious parallels.

I have re-prioritized my life.  Sandy has made me a much better morning person.  We have  both learned to compromise.

If you give in to your dogs every request and desire that is not an ideal relationship– then you become the pet and she is the master.

We have an understanding.

Every bath comes with lots of treats.

The pros far outweigh the cons.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 2)

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“She’s noisy, but not in a balky way.  She’s got a full range of growls, snorts and other sounds.

She’s a bit of a diva.

She likes to remind you that she’s there by either making noises (ranging from a purr to a bark), or snuggling into you.

The complications  of adopting a dog whose history is unknown and figuring out her quirks can be difficult.

She can be possessive of things, which leads me to think maybe she was on the street and had to fight for something, anything.

She doesn’t show signs of abuse but she has some anxious habits (like all her unusual sound effects).”

 

Nikki & Winston (he said, part 2)

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“I had Nikki 2 years and she was queen bee of the house and then the dynamic of the house changed.

I met my girlfriend and Nikki fell in love with her, then I fell in love with her.

And then we got Winston and the family unit became complete (for now).

Winston was an impulse love at first sight dog.  And then he turned out to be a huge pain in the ass.

The first year of his life was difficult.

He was sick with pneumonia.  He was indoors for 5 months, so that stunted our ability to socialize him for a while.

At first Nikki didn’t know what to do with puppy Winston.  She looked at me as if to say, what did you do?

The first year, Nikki was intent on being an only child.

Eventually Winston wore her down and now they are the best of friends.

The best thing is having them both together.  It’s rewarding watching them complement each other.  Nikki has made Winston more affectionate and Winston has made Nikki more playful.

The worst thing is that we travel a lot and there is nothing worse than walking into an empty house.”

Nikki & Winston (she said, part 3)

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“The best moments have been seeing them get close and become best friends.

Nikki is a different dog since getting Winston.  She is more nurturing and social.

Winston is a friendly Shiba She has taught Nikki to play with and trust other dogs.

Winston was a difficult puppy because he couldn’t go outside for months due to his pneumonia.  He wasn’t well enough to get his shots.

He was a vengeful puppy.  He would look us in the eyes and pee on the floor in front of us.

They get into the trash together.

They are partners.

We love them and they are our fur-babies.”