senior dogs

Scout, the Labrador Retriever that brought joy to a family (part 3)

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“My oldest, who is allergic is off at college and my husband is coping.

He took shots for a few years with our last dog, (who was supposed to by hypoallergenic), but has since stopped.

Scout has not only cheered up my son who asked for her, but is a great addition to the family.

She is a therapy dog.

Scout makes everybody happy.”

Eleanor Roosevelt, the mixed terrier rescue, that helped her people get over their last dog. (part 2)

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“My husband and I decided that we could either be selfish and be grief stricken for six months or so, or we could give another abandoned dog a chance.

Suzi died on the 15th of March and Ellie was abandoned on the 17th of March.

We all grieved together, as Ellie was abandoned and missing her people at the same time that we lost Suzi and were sad and alone.

Ellie seemed like a good fit for that reason.

After caring for a senior dog for over a year, we wanted to care for a dog with a bit more energy that was also more independent.

Ellie was meek and seemed depressed at the beginning.

After six months, she started coming around.”

Dipper, the Wheaton Terrier with nine lives (part 2)

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“I came home from medical school and in some sort of twisted way, having Dipper in this pitiful situation, took me out of the misery that I was experiencing in school.

I refocused on family and the things that made me happier before my med school misery.

Then of course, Dipper made a miraculous recovery.

He was able to put med school in perspective, and stick around afterwards.

Now is not a good time for me to get a dog, but I hope my parents choose to get another dog once Dipper is gone.”

Figaro, the true companion (Part 2)

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“My mother said she would leave me in the carriage outside the house with the dog attached and no-one bothered us.

The dog always protected me.

The hardest experiences with a dog is when they can no longer stay alive and they have to be put down.

Their lives are about being truly wonderful companions.

A very good friends said, dogs are replaceable, but humans are not.  You have to live beyond each dog, since we generally outlive our dogs.

Figaro, who is a purebred Golden is sick with cancer and is dying.”

Figaro, the true companion (part 1)

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“I’ve had dogs since I was 4 years old and I am 88 years old.

For me, it’s companionship an it makes me walk.

It’s a necessity for me to exercise.  I take a long walk in the morning and a long walk in the evening.

I find that having a dog is very relaxing.

They give you unfettered love.

All you have to do is feed, walk and pet them and they are happy.

The retriever only wants to please.

They obey everything you ask them to do without a question.

I have had between 15 an 20 Golden Retrievers.”

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“Within the first month of adopting Beau, he was photographed in Central Park and his image was posted on Rosie’s Dog Treats.  Fosterdogsnyc has a partnership with different pet vendors and supports their foster  families by providing them with resources.

We got a huge Harry Barker bed, toys and the treats with Beau’s image.

They also take care of his vet bills and medications. Beau takes $200.00 worth of medications per month.

The ease in which he’s integrated with our family has been great.

Once I took him off leash, it was like he had always belonged.

Now he sleeps in my bed at night with the other animals.

When his coughing is exacerbated I feel helpless and it’s terrible, but it makes me happy to know he will finish out his days with love, and getting good care.

I actually think Beau will die of old age before his heart gives out.”

Beau, the foster/hospice dog (part 2)

“I already had Oliver, who I adopted when I was in California.  Oliver was a rescue from a low kill shelter and I moved to New York soon after I got him.

I also have 3 cats.  With Oliver, 3 cats and Beau, it’s a full house.

When Beau came to my apartment he didn’t really interact with the others for the first few days.

After about 3 days he started coming into my room at night and sleeping in the dog bed.

It was about 6 weeks before beau’s personality started to show.  He got a big smile and had a spring in his step.  Going off leash in the park changed him.  He was so used to being around a lot of dogs that while in the park (with other dogs) he was in his element.

He was one of 2 thousand dogs in Korea that were going to be eaten.

He was lucky enough to be rescued because he was small and easy to transport.

They didn’t know about his heart condition.

We nicknamed him Chow because he was going to be chow and we thought it was ironic.”

 

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“I had another fospice (foster/hospice) dog through Second Chance.  She was older and so easy going.

Basically fospice is a dog that has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or a really old dog.

Both are hard to get adopted.

After the last dog, Maddie, passed away (she was old and had a problem with her spleen that was not treatable), we got Beau.

I saw him on fosterDOGSNYC.org and thought he looked like a nice little old man.

It said he had a heart condition and was around twelve.  I contacted fosterDogs and filled out an application.

A week later, Beau joined our family.”