relationship

Penny & Parker, the Pomeranians (she said)

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“We were asked to babysit a friend’s Pomeranian and my husband I fell madly in love with him.

His name was Prince and he was a very intelligent and personable dog.  He would look you in the eye and you really felt like he was trying to connect with you.

After that experience we decided we wanted a Pomeranian.

We didn’t know how to go about finding a dog.

We didn’t know about puppy mills and pets stores, and their connection.

We had no idea.

We got Penny from a pet store and she ended up costing us thousands of dollars in veterinary fees because she was so sick.  She had bad knees and all sorts of medical issues. Her knees cost $5,000.00.

I am grateful we had pet insurance, Petplan, they paid for everything.

Eventually, we decided Penny would be happier with another dog to play with.  We felt it would take some of the pressure off of us to constantly entertain her.

And it did.

She was happy then, but she’s happier now.

One year later, we learned the ropes and found a reputable breeder, registered with the AKC (American Kennel Club), and we got Parker, who cost us just about nothing in vet bills.

We tried to go through rescue first, but we came up against roadblocks. No one could tell us what size the dog would be an we needed a small dog for the safety of Penny.

We ended up with a breeder and we chose Parker from his photo.  He had a great face.

The first time Parker saw the beach, he lost his mind.  He buried his head in the sand.  He loved every moment on the beach.

It’s hard to say a worst moment because they have been a joy.

They make you get out of your house, out of yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Laura, the dog lover without a dog (part 1)

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“The very first time I came to the dog run was after my neighbors moved.  I got curious to see this place called the dog run where they used to take their dog.

The dogs and the people were wonderful.  I’ve made a lot of very good friends here.

I’ve watched the Dog Whisperer on television and I like to try out his techniques.                   I’ll give you an example: When I see children trying to get their dog to chase the ball and they don’t get the dog’s full attention first (they just throw the ball), I tell them, first make sure the dog is paying to them and and if they show the dog the ball and the dog sees them throw it, this is the best way to start the game.

I wouldn’t say that to just anybody.  It’s to the children who seem open to my advice.  They really want to play with the dogs but they don’t know how.  I try to show them how to get on the same wavelength as the dog.

Another thing that is so gratifying is to keep up with friends from the dog run while they are away.  I like to keep them updated on their dogs play and experiences at the run and put their minds at ease.

Once I was trying to pass by a small dog and it jumped up at me, lunging towards my face, and I fell and broke my arm.

This is one of the reasons I urge people to dissuade their dogs from jumping on people.”