red coon hounds

Bodi, the Great Rescue From Mississippi (Husband 1 Said, Part 2)

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“We started the application process and filled out our first application, in which I realized Mike, my husband, and I were talking about two different dogs.  I said, it’s a 10 week old puppy in Mississippi and we’re never going to get him.  Well, two hours later they called and said, he’s yours.

I was mad because I didn’t want that dog.

I asked the woman on the phone how this happened so fast.  She said she just googled me and saw the trailer to my last movie.  She said, anyone who made that movie, has to have a heart, so we fast tracked it.

When I got off the phone with her, I said to Mike, that’s our dog.

We’ve never looked back.

 

Olive, the Basset Hound, Staffordshire Terrier, and unknown mix, Rescue Dog (part 6, she said)

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“Olive was a perfect match for energy, activity level and temperament.

Our worst experience was when she ate a dark chocolate bar, which is toxic for dogs.

We rushed Olive to the vet, who said, he would do the best he could, but no guarantees.

We told our son, nine at the time, and he responded with big teardrops rolling down his cheeks, but said, every cloud has a silver lining, but I can’t possibly think of what it could be.

Luckily, Olive survived.

She is a member of our family.

When we go away without her, we feel like one of us is missing and the family is not complete.”

Ike, the rescue Boxer, Collie, Chow, Labrador Retriever, Hound mix (part 3, he said)

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“I saw very quickly, that Ike is a great dog.

He is different from my last dog, but great in his own ways.

One the biggest joys I have is watching Ike run.  He flies through the air.

He is always happy and a pleasure to watch.

I remembered the joys of having a dog.

I think in general, no matter what the level of personal trauma, dogs are there for you.

They give unconditional love, no matter what.”

L.T., the rescue hound, terrier, and golden retriever mix (part 2)

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“We spent close to four hours with him–my entire family sat with him to make sure it was going to work.

He was gentle with my granddaughter and he got along with my daughter’s dog, so we adopted him.

After five months we got an email from Paws Crossed asking if we would be interested in setting up a play date with L.T. and his sister.

We were happy to have the sibling puppies socialize together.

We met at a dog park in Westchester and they got along beautifully.

They looked identical, and after ten minutes they were inseparable.

We are going to set up a play date once a month.”

Ferris, the rescue Parvo survivor from the mountains of Canada (part 3)

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“I think Ferris has changed how we look at animals.

Instead of us thinking that he should do one thing our way, we’ve learned to adapt and compromise.

When he’s on the leash and an aggressive dog comes by, I step between them to stop anything before it happens.

I don’t say, “bad dog,” I simply diffuse the situation.

I know what works for both of us.

We average walking 6-10 miles of walking a day in the city.

I didn’t want him to suffer from our move to the city.

I wanted to maintain his quality of life.”

Ferris, the rescue Parvo survivor from the mountains of Canada (part 2)

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“He responded well to obedience training, (hounds are very strong minded).

He became easier to walk on a leash and his leash aggression began to subside.

He is 101 pounds, so when he would bark in a friendly or aggressive way, or go after another dog we felt it.

When we moved to the city from the mountainous countryside of Canada he adapted like he had always belonged.

People are often intimidated by Ferris because of his size, but he is a gentle giant.

The only time he gets aggressive is when another dog repeatedly comes after him; then he feels the need to defend himself.”

 

Ferris, the rescue Parvo survivor from the mountains of Canada (part 1)

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“We wanted a second dog, so we got Ferris.

We used to live in the mountains of Canada and we wanted a companion for our Golden Retriever, Ben, (who since passed away due to a brain tumor).

We found Ferris on a local internet advertisement.

He was about eight weeks and sick with Parvo.

We were told he had a 60% chance of recovering.

He survived Parvo.

Ferris came the alpha dog very quickly because Ben was so submissive.

He became a different dog when Ben died.

His dominant traits receded and he wasn’t as protective.”

 

Lola, the proud and independent Irish Setter (he said, part 4)

“I always found my dogs before.

Lola was a handful.

The first trainer told us she was proud and independent.

He said, she basically didn’t know we existed.

Eventually, we trained her.

As long as she is not hunting squirrels or rabbits she is a good dog.

The best single moment was after we went away for vacation and came back to her.

She wagged her tail so hard that she fell over.

The one thing we wish for with Lola is that she would be more friendly or playful with other dogs.

But, she is wonderful with people.”

Charlie Meatball, the Rhodesian Ridgeback mix rescue (he said, part 3)

“After the four weeks of no walking he still had exercise restriction; no running and no long walks for another three months.

It was very rewarding when he was finally able to exercise.

He ran and ran and had 20 times the endurance.

The most important thing was that it was all worth it.

Without Charlie we wouldn’t live where we do.

We live by the park for Charlie.”