pomeranians

Frida and Elmo, the California rescues (she said, part 2)

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“They were starving to death and weighted two thirds of their current weight.

It took me a year to move and get them to adapt to living with my 2 cats.

I gave them about a month of gradual transition.

I started with baby gates in the hallway and gradually increased their space accessibility.  I took them on leash walks in the living room.

I also took them to two rounds of obedience training in Los Angeles.

I made two separate trips across the country– one with the cats and another with the dogs.  I thought it would be less stressful for all of us.

Once I got to New York City I moved into a studio and within a week it was fine.

Everybody found their corner.

I’ve been here 2 1/2 years and it’s been fine.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 1)

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“I was thinking to adopt in August of 2013 but I didn’t really know what I wanted.

I stopped in to a shelter just to see what the process was and they were taking Sandy for a walk, so we had a chance meeting.  I was with a friend and a roommate and we were all taken with her.

I didn’t know what I was looking for in a dog, but she was the right size (I think of her as the biggest small dog).

She has a ridiculously cute underbite, her legs turn out, she has one white paw and she was immediately warm towards us.”

 

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“Within the first month of adopting Beau, he was photographed in Central Park and his image was posted on Rosie’s Dog Treats.  Fosterdogsnyc has a partnership with different pet vendors and supports their foster  families by providing them with resources.

We got a huge Harry Barker bed, toys and the treats with Beau’s image.

They also take care of his vet bills and medications. Beau takes $200.00 worth of medications per month.

The ease in which he’s integrated with our family has been great.

Once I took him off leash, it was like he had always belonged.

Now he sleeps in my bed at night with the other animals.

When his coughing is exacerbated I feel helpless and it’s terrible, but it makes me happy to know he will finish out his days with love, and getting good care.

I actually think Beau will die of old age before his heart gives out.”

Beau, the foster/hospice dog (part 2)

“I already had Oliver, who I adopted when I was in California.  Oliver was a rescue from a low kill shelter and I moved to New York soon after I got him.

I also have 3 cats.  With Oliver, 3 cats and Beau, it’s a full house.

When Beau came to my apartment he didn’t really interact with the others for the first few days.

After about 3 days he started coming into my room at night and sleeping in the dog bed.

It was about 6 weeks before beau’s personality started to show.  He got a big smile and had a spring in his step.  Going off leash in the park changed him.  He was so used to being around a lot of dogs that while in the park (with other dogs) he was in his element.

He was one of 2 thousand dogs in Korea that were going to be eaten.

He was lucky enough to be rescued because he was small and easy to transport.

They didn’t know about his heart condition.

We nicknamed him Chow because he was going to be chow and we thought it was ironic.”

 

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“I had another fospice (foster/hospice) dog through Second Chance.  She was older and so easy going.

Basically fospice is a dog that has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or a really old dog.

Both are hard to get adopted.

After the last dog, Maddie, passed away (she was old and had a problem with her spleen that was not treatable), we got Beau.

I saw him on fosterDOGSNYC.org and thought he looked like a nice little old man.

It said he had a heart condition and was around twelve.  I contacted fosterDogs and filled out an application.

A week later, Beau joined our family.”

Diego, as in Diego Rivera (he said, part 4)

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“My wife and I board dogs sometimes and Diego is the best concierge.  He is happy to see other dogs, shares his food and his dog bed, too.

He likes the company.

Diego had a pinched nerve in his back and I took him to the animal hospital on the east side.  They thought it was no big deal but he was still screaming in pain.  We took him to our regular veterinarian and he needed to be crated for 3 months and we gave him different meds around the clock.  That was a difficult time.

When Diego comes back from his walks he runs in and tears around the apartment, really happy to be home–here.”

Diego, as in Don Diego de la Vega, aka Zorro (he said part 3)

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“It was my wife’s idea to get Diego.

My sister was very ill and before she went into hospice care, she asked us to adopt him.

My wife had fallen in love with him when we visited previously, so she wanted to adopt him when my sister asked.

At first I told my sister, no.

It was an expense we couldn’t afford and we had just lost our last dog, Winnie.

As the end was getting closer, I gave in and agreed to pick up Diego.

I changed my mind because my sister found a home for her other 2 dogs, pugs.  My wife really wanted Diego, so I agreed to it.

I went up to Rochester before she went into hospice to say goodbye and I rented a car, got a crate and wanted to get out of there so quickly, that I got a speeding ticket.

Meanwhile, Diego didn’t know what was going on and started hyperventilating in the back.  I would stop along the way to walk him, but nothing helped.

When we got to our apartment, his new home, the first thing he did was pee in the bedroom.

He was never trained to walk on a leash and he was just let out in the backyard to do his business.

He still has irrational fear sometimes on our walks, but he is the least aggressive dog you will meet.”

Penny & Parker, the Pomeranians (he said)

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“We got my dogs for my wife.  That’s my first answer.  Second answer is, my wife has been partially disabled from Lyme’s Disease, so we got the dogs to keep her company because she’s home alone a lot.

The best moments with the dogs have been getting the regular exercise from walking them.

Now that they are a little bit older they can be walked off leash.  It’s the freedom to walk them without managing them so tightly.

The worst moment was when Penny broke her leg when she was 1 year old.  It was on my birthday, I might add.  She jumped off my brother’s couch and screamed bloody murder, so we knew it was more than just a sprain.  We rushed her to the vet immediately.  That took 6 weeks to heal.  We didn’t have Parker yet, and keeping her calm was a real challenge because she was still a puppy.

Parker calms Penny down.  He plays with her regularly so she gets her energy out of her system.    They engage each other in wresting and play and she has a constant companion on walks.

Penny was a sad puppy before Parker came along.  She would hide under the couch and cry a lot.

As soon as Parker came along her mood changed immediately, she was much happier. She still hides under the couch on occasion, but there’s very little crying.

They have brought a playfulness and a sense of innocence to our lives.”

Penny & Parker, the Pomeranians (she said)

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“We were asked to babysit a friend’s Pomeranian and my husband I fell madly in love with him.

His name was Prince and he was a very intelligent and personable dog.  He would look you in the eye and you really felt like he was trying to connect with you.

After that experience we decided we wanted a Pomeranian.

We didn’t know how to go about finding a dog.

We didn’t know about puppy mills and pets stores, and their connection.

We had no idea.

We got Penny from a pet store and she ended up costing us thousands of dollars in veterinary fees because she was so sick.  She had bad knees and all sorts of medical issues. Her knees cost $5,000.00.

I am grateful we had pet insurance, Petplan, they paid for everything.

Eventually, we decided Penny would be happier with another dog to play with.  We felt it would take some of the pressure off of us to constantly entertain her.

And it did.

She was happy then, but she’s happier now.

One year later, we learned the ropes and found a reputable breeder, registered with the AKC (American Kennel Club), and we got Parker, who cost us just about nothing in vet bills.

We tried to go through rescue first, but we came up against roadblocks. No one could tell us what size the dog would be an we needed a small dog for the safety of Penny.

We ended up with a breeder and we chose Parker from his photo.  He had a great face.

The first time Parker saw the beach, he lost his mind.  He buried his head in the sand.  He loved every moment on the beach.

It’s hard to say a worst moment because they have been a joy.

They make you get out of your house, out of yourself.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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