Pekingese

Sandy, the Rescue, That is A Big Dog, In A Small Body (Part 4)

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“Sandy is a fun dog to come home to.

She always wags her tail to greet me.  We have our moment together and then we usually go for a walk.

I don’t have children, but there are obvious parallels.

I have re-prioritized my life.  Sandy has made me a much better morning person.  We have  both learned to compromise.”

Sandy, the Rescue, That is A Big Dog, In A Small Body (Part 3)

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“The complications  of adopting a dog whose history is unknown and figuring out her quirks can be difficult.

She can be possessive of things, which leads me to think maybe she was on the street and had to fight for something, anything.

She doesn’t show signs of abuse but she has some anxious habits (like all her unusual sound effects).”

Sandy, the Rescue, That’s a Big Dog in a Small Body (Part 2)

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“She’s noisy, but not in a balky way.  She’s got a full range of growls, snorts and other sounds.

She’s a bit of a diva.

She likes to remind you that she’s there by either making noises (ranging from a purr to a bark), or snuggling into you.”

Sandy, the Rescue, That is a Big Dog in a Small Body (part 1)

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“I was thinking to adopt in August of 2013 but I didn’t really know what I wanted.

I stopped in to a shelter just to see what the process was and they were taking Sandy for a walk, so we had a chance meeting.  I was with a friend and a roommate and we were all taken with her.

I didn’t know what I was looking for in a dog, but she was the right size (I think of her as the biggest small dog).

She has a ridiculously cute underbite, her legs turn out, she has one white paw and she was immediately warm towards us.”

Sandy, the Rescue, That is A Big Dog, In A Small Body (Part 5)

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“If you give in to your dogs every request and desire that is not an ideal relationship– then you become the pet and she is the master.

We have an understanding.

Every bath comes with lots of treats.

The pros far outweigh the cons.”

Kasidy, the contemplative dog walker (part 3)

fullsizerender-11“The only limitation of this job is that it is very physically demanding.

I try shoe inserts, take ibuprofen as needed, and am aware of my posture and try to walk as efficiently as possible.

The concrete is hard on the body.  I walk between 7-9 hours a day.

Another downside of the job is the weather– extreme heat, rain and cold can be difficult.

Whenever I am coming to work, riding on the train, I take the first 15 minutes to meditate.

I meditate on the word emptiness.  I try to mimic their openness.

I try to just enjoy where we are in that moment.”

Hero, Izumi, Melons, a family of rescues (part 2 –she said)

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“I volunteer at the CACC (Care for Animal Control Center) and Melons was set to be euthanized.

He was almost 4 and had kennel cough.

I had him pulled from the euth list and agreed to foster him–that was 6 months ago.

I pretty much knew from the first day that I would keep him.

I didn’t make it official until I had him for 4 months.

I also volunteer with Best Friends Animal Society and they were having a pop up adoption event where I was working.

I saw that the CACC had an adoption van parked nearby and went out to say, hello.

One of the adoption counselors had Izzy in her lap.  She looked exactly like Hero and was incredibly sweet.

I finished working the Best Friend’s event and went home with Izzy.”

Milo and Mr. Humbert, the delinquents (part 2)

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“That was 2011.

Bert was very attached to my college aged son and didn’t want to travel anymore.

Whenever he saw my suitcase he wouldn’t leave my son’s lap and made himself scarce during travel preparations.

I wasn’t really looking for another dog.

I knew my husband wouldn’t be thrilled, but I saw Milo at an adoption event at our pet store.  He was the exact same size as Mr. Bert, but with a very different personality.

We call Mr. Bert the mean mother because he’s always correcting other dogs.

We call Milo the perm puppy because he is always getting into trouble.”

Elmo & Frida, the California rescues (she said, part 3)

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“Before I moved here I got rid of a lifetime of stuff.

Six months after moving here my cat sitter came to see how the dogs were living and she cried from joy.

She was the one who had rescued them and couldn’t believe how far they had come.

The dogs love New York City.

They were invigorated as soon as they got their first whiff of the brisk November air.

The down side that immediately occurred for me, was that I stopped going to yoga at 9 a.m. because I am out walking the dogs.  But, I still getting exercise walking them.

Alternately, some of the best moments have been off leash in Central Park, on our morning and late night walks.

It’s complete joy.

Elmo just takes off and runs.  He is exuberant and loves running.

Frida had been abused so it’s a good chance for her to deal with her fear and interact with other dogs.

Having dogs brings me out too.  I am not a social person but I get out every day with them.

They bring me great joy.

Pets in general are a great part of my life.”

Frida and Elmo, the California rescues (she said, part 2)

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“They were starving to death and weighted two thirds of their current weight.

It took me a year to move and get them to adapt to living with my 2 cats.

I gave them about a month of gradual transition.

I started with baby gates in the hallway and gradually increased their space accessibility.  I took them on leash walks in the living room.

I also took them to two rounds of obedience training in Los Angeles.

I made two separate trips across the country– one with the cats and another with the dogs.  I thought it would be less stressful for all of us.

Once I got to New York City I moved into a studio and within a week it was fine.

Everybody found their corner.

I’ve been here 2 1/2 years and it’s been fine.”