Animal Rescue Fund

Lola, the Corgi, Border Collie, Australian Shepherd mix (he said, part 3)

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“My son was watching tv and feeding her raisins.

We had to rush her to the vet because my girlfriend and I knew it was dangerous.

The vet had to induce vomiting and put her on fluids for hydration.

We now have a list of food on the refrigerator, and the kids learned a valuable lesson.

One of the ways Lola has changed my life is that I feel more grounded.

In a divorce situation it’s strange having children come and go (for both the parents and the kids), and having Lola all the time has helped smooth out the waves.

One more thing– I recommend adopting and supporting your local shelter.”

Batman, the fated dog (part 2)

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“All around, Batman is a source of unconditional love.

I moved back to New York City after a difficult breakup and Batman served as a great support system.

He was always there for me during lonely times.

Breakups tend to make you feel unimportant and dogs overcompensate to fill that void.

Batman is the sweetest thing.  He’s a cuddler and at night he sleeps between my arm and my shoulder.

I don’t have any sisters or brothers and Batman feels like family.

He’s like my child.

I feel responsible for him.

He requires a certain amount of maturity.

He keeps me in line and on a schedule.

Batman gives me structure.”

Batman, the fated dog (part 1)

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“I had a dog who got run over by a car and I was devastated about it.

I just thought the best way to get over that loss was to get another dog.

I looked at an online rescue agency called Mustard Sandwich and I saw Batman’s photo.

I wanted to get a dog and name him Batman.

Batman and his brothers were listed online and they were all named after cities except for Batman, who was already called “Batman.”

I thought; this is my fate.

I also thought, this is MY Batman.

I applied for him online.

I was moving from New York to Florida and picked him up on the drive down.

When I first saw him, he was only 2 pounds, his ears were all floppy and he was the cutest thing.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 3)

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“Sandy is a fun dog to come home to.

She always wags her tail to greet me.  We have our moment together and then we usually go for a walk.

I don’t have children, but there are obvious parallels.

I have re-prioritized my life.  Sandy has made me a much better morning person.  We have  both learned to compromise.

If you give in to your dogs every request and desire that is not an ideal relationship– then you become the pet and she is the master.

We have an understanding.

Every bath comes with lots of treats.

The pros far outweigh the cons.”

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 2)

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“She’s noisy, but not in a balky way.  She’s got a full range of growls, snorts and other sounds.

She’s a bit of a diva.

She likes to remind you that she’s there by either making noises (ranging from a purr to a bark), or snuggling into you.

The complications  of adopting a dog whose history is unknown and figuring out her quirks can be difficult.

She can be possessive of things, which leads me to think maybe she was on the street and had to fight for something, anything.

She doesn’t show signs of abuse but she has some anxious habits (like all her unusual sound effects).”

 

Sandra, Sandy for short (part 1)

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“I was thinking to adopt in August of 2013 but I didn’t really know what I wanted.

I stopped in to a shelter just to see what the process was and they were taking Sandy for a walk, so we had a chance meeting.  I was with a friend and a roommate and we were all taken with her.

I didn’t know what I was looking for in a dog, but she was the right size (I think of her as the biggest small dog).

She has a ridiculously cute underbite, her legs turn out, she has one white paw and she was immediately warm towards us.”

 

Beau, the foster/hospice dog (part 2)

“I already had Oliver, who I adopted when I was in California.  Oliver was a rescue from a low kill shelter and I moved to New York soon after I got him.

I also have 3 cats.  With Oliver, 3 cats and Beau, it’s a full house.

When Beau came to my apartment he didn’t really interact with the others for the first few days.

After about 3 days he started coming into my room at night and sleeping in the dog bed.

It was about 6 weeks before beau’s personality started to show.  He got a big smile and had a spring in his step.  Going off leash in the park changed him.  He was so used to being around a lot of dogs that while in the park (with other dogs) he was in his element.

He was one of 2 thousand dogs in Korea that were going to be eaten.

He was lucky enough to be rescued because he was small and easy to transport.

They didn’t know about his heart condition.

We nicknamed him Chow because he was going to be chow and we thought it was ironic.”

 

Beau, the foster/hospice dog

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“I had another fospice (foster/hospice) dog through Second Chance.  She was older and so easy going.

Basically fospice is a dog that has been diagnosed with a terminal illness or a really old dog.

Both are hard to get adopted.

After the last dog, Maddie, passed away (she was old and had a problem with her spleen that was not treatable), we got Beau.

I saw him on fosterDOGSNYC.org and thought he looked like a nice little old man.

It said he had a heart condition and was around twelve.  I contacted fosterDogs and filled out an application.

A week later, Beau joined our family.”

Nellie, the talking Beagle (he said)

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“I always loved dogs but because of the business of life I felt it would be an intrusion on how I lived.

Both of my daughters have dogs and I love them.

Then one day my wife and I were at an event at ARF (Animal Rescue Fund) and fell in love with a Beagle who stared at us lovingly.

After taking her for a walk, we went into the ARF office for the mandatory interview.  Nellie jumped on my lap while we were waiting for our interview and I literally started to cry.

Three years later, when I come home from the office, Nellie kisses me in a way that could substitute for a shower.

My work with very ill and older clients who have dementia is extremely stressful.  I deal with sad and sometimes tragic cases.

The unlimited love, affection and attention that I receive from Nellie chases away the depression.

Nellie’s welcoming everyday when I come home as a continuum is so satisfying.  She is an alternative to antidepressant drugs; she is my uptake inhibitor.”

Nellie, the talking Beagle (she said, part 2)

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“There’s never been a bad time with her.  There were dietary issues.

My husband left his backpack on the floor and he forgot there were red velvet cupcakes from an office party inside.  Of course she found them and had herself a party.

The next morning on our walk in the park she couldn’t move.  I picked her up and rushed her to the vet, where they kept her for the whole day doing tests to make sure she was okay.  Fortunately, I had pet insurance.

She is a great anti-depressant.  She is better than any pill.

My life has much more of a routine.  I’ve discovered the park that I have lived next door to for forty years,  I have made a whole new circle of friends and I am never lovely.  Having Nellie has rejuvenated my marriage. We are both able share in loving this beautiful dog.         These are the pluses.

I don’t like to leave her, and it’s curtailed travel plans.  I am no longer able to go places spontaneously.

Forget kids, get a dog.